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By National Coalition for the Homeless

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Residents are encouraged but not required to participate in treatment. 5 million dollars in one year by significantly cutting residents’ medical expenses, county jail bookings, sobering center usage, and shelter usage. 1 million operating costs. After one year, 66% of the residents remained in the housing. Residents have voluntarily cut their alcohol consumption in half. html. 32 Ten Meanest Cities While most cities throughout the country either have laws or engage in practices that criminalize homeless persons, some city laws or practices stand out as more egregious than others in their attempt to criminalize homelessness.

After one year, 66% of the residents remained in the housing. Residents have voluntarily cut their alcohol consumption in half. html. 32 Ten Meanest Cities While most cities throughout the country either have laws or engage in practices that criminalize homeless persons, some city laws or practices stand out as more egregious than others in their attempt to criminalize homelessness. The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty and the National Coalition for the Homeless have chosen the following top 10 meanest cities during 2007 and 2008 based on one or more of the following criteria: the number of anti-homeless laws in the city, the enforcement of those laws and severity of penalties, the general political climate toward homeless people in the city, local advocate support for the meanest designation, the city’s history of criminalization measures, and the existence of pending or recently enacted criminalization legislation in the city.

The city claimed that homeless people who gathered weekly for meals created safety and sanitation problems for the community. City Commissioner Patty Sheehan originally pushed for the ordinance following grievances from business owners and residents who complained about homeless people causing problems at a downtown park popular with joggers and dog walkers. Shortly after the ordinance was passed, the ACLU sued the city on behalf of First Vagabonds Church and Orlando Food Not Bombs, two groups that share food with homeless individuals on a weekly basis.

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