Download The Revelation of the Name YHWH to Moses: Perspectives from by George H. van Kooten PDF

By George H. van Kooten

The revelation of YHWH's identify to Moses is a momentous occasion in accordance with the previous testomony. The identify 'Yahweh' is of critical significance in Judaism, and 'Yahwism' grew to become tantamount to Jewish monotheism. As such, this designation of God additionally attracted the eye of pagan writers within the Graeco-Roman interval. And early Christians needed to take care of this divine identify besides. those 3 views on YHWH represent the framework for this quantity. it seems that the identify of God and its revelation to Moses represent a huge subject which runs from the ebook of Exodus in the course of the previous testomony, early Judaism, and early Christianity. It additionally attracted pagan philosophical curiosity, either confident and detrimental. The identify of God was once not just perceived from an insider's standpoint, but additionally provoked a response from outsiders. The mixed views exhibit the basic significance of the divine identify for the formation of Jewish and Christian identities.

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Additional info for The Revelation of the Name YHWH to Moses: Perspectives from Judaism, the Pagan Graeco-Roman World, and Early Christianity (Themes in Biblical Narrative)

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For a different explanation, Adolph Büchler, ‘The New “Fragment of an Uncanonical Gospel”,’ Jewish Quarterly Review 20 (1908) 330–46, who refers to some stories about the aristocracy visiting the Temple for prayer. For an entirely different interpretation of the Fragment Oxyrhynchus 840, cf. recently François Bovon, ‘Fragment Oxyrhynchus 840, Fragment of a Lost Gospel, Witness of an Early Christian Controversy Over Purity,’ Journal of Biblical Literature 119 (2000) 705–28. 21 References to the prohibition of footwear in the Temple or on the Temple Mount are dealt with most recently by Yaron Z.

Houtman, Exodus, vol. 1 (Historical Commentary on the Old Testament), Louvain 1993. These overviews surpass the comments in Theodor H. Gaster, Myth, Legend, and Custom in the Old Testament, London 1969, vol. 1, 231–2. The following list is mainly based on Houtman. 7 But even though there may be little Midianite about the story, this does not exclude a Northern Arabian setting. ), but there is also some scant linguistic evidence for an Arabian setting. ’8 In popular thought, the removal of one’s sandals is seen as a typically Islamic practice, but one cannot retroject without further ado this Islamic custom before entering the mosque back to Arabian customs in Mosaic or Israelite times.

C. Propp, Exodus 1–18 (Anchor Bible 2), New York 1999 and C. Houtman, Exodus, vol. 1 (Historical Commentary on the Old Testament), Louvain 1993. These overviews surpass the comments in Theodor H. Gaster, Myth, Legend, and Custom in the Old Testament, London 1969, vol. 1, 231–2. The following list is mainly based on Houtman. 7 But even though there may be little Midianite about the story, this does not exclude a Northern Arabian setting. ), but there is also some scant linguistic evidence for an Arabian setting.

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